A Difficult Course (A)

by: Susan Ashford, George Siedel

Publication Date: September 10, 2009
Length: 5 pages
Product ID#: 1-428-866

Core Disciplines: Ethics, Leadership/Organizational Behavior

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Description

What are the consequences of cheating? What happens when you do something against your own principles? A Difficult Course (A) details the circumstances that led to the main character’s slip in judgement while at business school. Students are asked to impose the appropriate punishment on the protagonist of the case and assess the situation according to their own beliefs and principles. A Difficult Course (B) is the resulting outcome.

This case was developed for both undergraduate and graduate level students. For a version that is geared toward executive-MBA programs, please see Honor Code (A) and Honor Code (B).

Teaching Objectives

After reading and discussing the material, students should:

  • Describe appropriate business terms and principles.
  • Apply critical concepts to define a solution to the case.
  • Successfully articulate data and information in support of the solution proposed.
  • Critically analyze and discuss other responses and solutions to the case.
  • Draw lessons from the case analysis.