General Mills Commits to Sourcing 100% Sustainable Cocoa

by: Andrew Hoffman

Publication Date: February 25, 2016
Length: 16 pages
Product ID#: 1-430-483

Core Disciplines: International Business, Leadership/Organizational Behavior, Social Impact, Strategy & Management, Sustainability

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Description

Jacob Madisson is wondering how General Mills will make it to its goal of sourcing 100% sustainable cocoa by 2020. Demand is increasing and some are wondering if the supply of the precious raw material will dry up. Prices will certainly increase, nevertheless. With only 10% of its African-based cocoa sourced sustainably, General Mills needs a new strategy. How will the company move forward?

Teaching Objectives

After reading and discussing the material, students should:

  • Identify the prospects and challenges of sustainable sourcing of raw ingredients from international markets.
  • Explore future actions and responsibilities for accomplishing sustainability objectives.
  • Explain the role of business in implementing sustainable sourcing goals.
  • Generalize the learnings of this case to other business challenges and decisions in organizations other than the one analyzed in this case study.